How to Keep Your Job Search Moving

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The job search is hard…We know. We hear from countless people every day who feel weary and demoralized after weeks or months of rejections and dead ends. The job market may be booming and unemployment levels are reaching all-time lows, but this news isn’t very comforting to those in the middle of a long and exhausting uphill climb. No matter what broad statistics may suggest, you’re not a statistic, and if you’re starting to lose your motivation and don’t know which way to turn, you’re not alone. Here are a few considerations that can help you stay in motion.

If your methods aren’t working, make a change.

After ten rejections in a row, it’s natural to decide that there’s something wrong with you. Frustrated job seekers often wonder what might have happened if they hadn’t earned that B minus in history, or if they had taken a summer internship with an accounting firm instead of traveling the world. These speculations are not useful. But here’s something that is: change your search strategy. It’s your strategy that isn’t working, not your core character, your grades in middle school, or your general approach to life.

Change your search habits.

Start by altering the way you seek out open positions. If you’re only searching by sifting through giant online job boards, your odds of landing each position may be one in a hundred, or even lower. So even if you send out 50 resumes per day, you’re still choosing the hardest path to victory. Instead, vary your search by spending only a few minutes on these job boards per day. Dedicate the rest of your search time to tracking down personal contacts, looking for leads in real life, and sending emails and texts to any individual person that may be able to help you.

Tighten your resume.

No matter how great your resume may seem to you, there’s a chance it could be better. Seek guidance from a resume editor or job search expert, or contact the team at CSS and find out how we can help you improve your profile.

Expand your target.

If you only plan to accept jobs that fall into a very specific and narrow range, you may spend more time on the market. For example, if you’re only looking for full time positions, in a specific corner of your industry, in a narrow geographic area, this may be contributing to your frustration. Consider taking on a temporary or part-time position for a while; this may lead to a full-time gig. You can also consider consulting, working as an independent contractor, joining a startup, or launching your own business.

No matter what you’re looking for, we can help you find it. And in the meantime, we can help you tighten your search strategy so you find a faster path to your destination. Contact the Little Rock staffing experts at CSS today.

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