For an Active Job, Consider the Healthcare Field

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A recently released Careerbuilder study compiled employment figures from over 90 independent sources in order to assess the future of the non-desk job, and fortunately, the outlook seems bright. During the last few decades of our digital age, we witnessed the rise of the desk job and the concurrent rise of the desk-job lifestyle. Most positions at the higher end of the wage spectrum involve sitting in a chair and staring at a screen for long hours, all day, every day.

But if this just isn’t the way you’d like to spend your days and you’re looking for a way to break the chains and get on your feet, the study reveals some good news. While desk positions still dominate the market landscape above salaries of $100,000 (only 7 percent of the positions at this range are non-desk jobs), active-job salaries and availability are on the rise. To find these opportunities, consider positions like real estate broker, power line installer, and mechanical engineering technician, all of which pay at least 20 to 30 dollars per hour.

Even better, consider stepping into the health care field. A wide variety of healthcare jobs are perfect for those who like to stay on their feet.

Non-Desk Jobs in Healthcare

While the highest paying roles in the healthcare industry often involve many years of expensive training and post graduate education (like surgeons, anesthesiologists, and administrators), many more are accessible with a two or four year degree plus required experience and licensing credentials. Becoming a physician’s assistant, a registered nurse, or a healthcare technician can pay off quickly, with salaries for these roles beginning well above 35,000 dollars per year. Medical billing experts and clinical assistants may earn slightly less, but these positions can form stable foundations on which to build a long term career.

Active jobs are healthier.

Getting out of your chair may be an no-brainer if you have trouble sitting still, but even if you can handle parking on your rear for ten hours every day, there are still plenty of reasons why it’s better not to. Active jobs typically result in healthier workers, with lower rates of weight gain and physical pain than their desk-job counterparts. Workers are also less likely to complain about their working environments when they’re on their feet.

So consider taking a job that protects you from a host of illnesses, from cardiovascular problems to diabetes. While you’re at it, you may be helping others overcome their own challenges and setbacks. For more on how to find a healthcare position that fits your lifestyle and personality, contact the staffing experts at CSS.

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