Proper Etiquette While Communicating with a Recruiter

Posted

Recruiters can be a valuable resource during your job search, and if you enlist their help, they can often take your candidacy further than you could manage on your own. But recruiters are also very busy, they’re under considerable pressure, they’re fielding multiple candidates and roles at one time, and most important: they work for their employer clients, not for you. So when you’re working with a recruiter, it pays to demonstrate respect, do your share of the work, and make it as easy as possible for your recruiter to help you. Here are a few ways to communicate with your recruiter on her own terms.

Grab attention.

Don’t make it difficult for recruiters to find you. Put yourself out there and make your resume as visible as a giant banner. Post your credentials on Linkedin, use keywords that include your target job title and geographic area, and make your resume publically available on job boards and your personal website or blog.

When recruiters contact you, respond quickly.

If a recruiter sends you a post that you find interesting, don’t sit on it…Answer quickly. Keep your response short, clear, and respectful. Summarize your most important credentials and attach a copy of your resume to your email. Provide clear contact information and details on how and when to reach you.

Once you’ve opened a dialogue, keep it going.

Rude behavior, a demanding, entitled tone, or a typo can tank your message and diminish your chances of a response—and of course it can put your dream job out of reach. Once you’ve opened a conversation with a recruiter, keep the dialogue in motion by answering all correspondence as quickly and completely as possible. Be persistent, but don’t badger your recruiter with multiple emails or phone calls in a row. Remember, she’s getting paid by the company to find the right candidate and staff the position; she’s NOT getting paid by you, and it isn’t her goal to help you land the job. If you recognize this essential truth, your relationship will stay on steady footing.

Be honest.

Don’t hide any essential facts from your recruiter, and if you asks you to provide more detailed information about what you can do or what you’re looking for, be upfront. Don’t pretend you want something you don’t actually want just to keep your options open. If the offered salary range is too low for you, or the commute seems too long, say so. There are other jobs out there for you; if this one isn’t a match, don’t waste her time—or your own.

For more on how to work with your recruiter to land the job that’s right for you, reach out to the Little Rock staffing team at CSS.

CTA

Leave a Reply

  • (will not be published)