Manufacturing Industry Misconceptions

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Far too often, the interests of the manufacturing industry are overlooked by legislators, lawmakers and voters due to general misconceptions about what manufacturing means and what it represents to the economy and society as a whole. Just as often, younger workers and students neglect to consider this industry as they contemplate their future careers and courses of study, and they do so because the same common misconceptions are holding them back. If you’re thinking of building a manufacturing career but you’re held back by any of the concerns below, it might wise to take a closer look.

Myth 1: Manufacturing is a relic from the past.

If the word “factory” or “production facility” makes you picture a bygone area of smoke stacks, conveyor belts, and steam whistles, think again. Modern manufacturing still involves smoke stacks (sometimes), but innovation and technology are the order of the day. 3D printing, nano-chemistry, wearable technology, satellite imaging, green innovations, and advanced pharmaceuticals are taking over the manufacturing landscape, and the makers, builders, and doers of tomorrow are taking frontline positions in this dynamic field.

Myth 2: Manufacturing means machines, not people.

When you think of automobile or consumer electronics factory, you may picture robotic devices taking over human jobs and running assembly lines designed to create more devices that take over more human jobs. But the robot revolution isn’t happening any time soon. Manufacturing facilities create countless jobs that help both skilled and unskilled workers advance into the middle class. This industry represents a path to opportunity.

Myth 3: Manufacturing pollutes the planet.

Not all manufacturing companies are digging in their heels and fighting regulations designed to keep toxins out of our water, land, and air. In fact, many companies are working hard to comply with these regulations and some are even developing their own systems that increase energy efficiency, reduce waste, cut carbon emissions and maximize solar and wind power.

Myth 4: Manufacturing is a dead-end career path.

Some young, ambitious, intelligent employees are searching for careers that bring personal meaning and make the world a better place. They don’t necessarily want to dedicate their days and years to an organization that makes belt buckles, ice cream scoops, or all-weather tires. But these young employees should think again. The knowledge, experience, and work ethic gained in this industry can bring success in any other field, and in the meantime, life-saving medical treatments, healthy food, construction materials, and advanced electronics are necessary aspects of our growing society.

For more on the benefits of a career in manufacturing, reach out to the industry experts at CSS.

 

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